Calendar 2022

Welcome to the additional birds information. See below the birds and more details about the bird printed on the calendar page.

January : White Rumped Shama

A thrushlike bird with a long, graduated tail. Males are glossy black above and rich chestnut below. Females are similar but paler. Juveniles are reddish brown with rusty wingbars. Bornean birds have a bright white crown. Occurs in dense lowland and hill forests, forest edge, and overgrown orchards and plantations; widely poached for the cagebird trade in much of its native range. The song is a varied series of loud whistles and flutelike notes, often involving mimicry of other birds; does not repeat phrases. Call is a sharp “tsick.”

February : Black Naped Monarch

The black-naped monarch or black-naped blue flycatcher (Hypothymis azurea) is a slim and agile passerine bird belonging to the family of monarch flycatchers found in southern and south-eastern Asia. They are sexually dimorphic, with the male having a distinctive black patch on the back of the head and a narrow black half collar (“necklace”), while the female is duller with olive brown wings and lacking the black markings on the head. They have a call that is similar to that of the Asian paradise flycatcher, and in tropical forest habitats, pairs may join mixed-species foraging flocks. Populations differ slightly in plumage colour and sizes

March : Indian Paradise Flycatcher – Male

A graceful looking flycatcher, the adult male sport a long ribbonlike tail. The males occur in two color morphs cinnamon and white. Both color morphs sport a glossy black head with blue ring around the eye, but white morph is entirely white below while the cinnamon morph has cinnamon upperparts and tail, and dirty white underparts. The females are cinnamon above with a grayish throat, a shorter tail, and they lack the male’s blue eyering. They make short aerial sallies after insects, usually returning to the same perch. Occasionally descends to ground to pull apart insects. Chiefly found in wooded habitats. Their call is a harsh “shreew.”

April : Red Whiskered Bulbul

Medium-sized songbird, brown above and whitish below with a tall black crest and dark “spur” on the side of the breast. Small red patch on ear and red undertail coverts. White tips on tail feathers. Generally found in pairs or small groups in gardens, orchards, forest edge, and open forests. Pleasant song consists of rich warbled phrases; calls include high-pitched pips, a long buzzy note, and a sharp “pik-pik-a-wew.” A common species in the Asian cagebird trade and escapee populations occasionally become established north of their natural range

May : Tickell’s blue Flycatcher

Attractive medium-sized flycatcher with blue upperparts and orange-and-white underparts, with the most orange on the chest and the throat. Male is more intensely-colored overall than the female. Smaller-billed profile, less extensive orange, and paler face distinguish this species from male Hill Blue Flycatcher. Extensive orange on the throat separates Tickell’s from Blue-throated Flycatcher. Favors open hill forests as well as forest edge, particularly in drier, scrubby areas, often close to water. Both sexes give a pleasant high-pitched tinkling song. Calls include dry rattles and metallic clinks.

June : Painted Stork

A large stork with a long yellow bill that curves down at the tip, like that of an Ibis. Adult is primarily white with black striped markings on the wings and bright pink on tertials. Also note the bright orange face, pinkish legs, and speckled band across the chest. Immatures are duller, with a brown wash, and lack the chest band. These storks typically fly with their head and neck drooping almost at or below the belly level. Often seen near water bodies such as wetlands, marshes, and flooded agricultural fields. Breeds in crowded colonies, often with other waterbirds.

July : Amur Falcon

he male of this small falcon is sooty gray with rufous-orange thighs and vent. The females are duller gray above, and their white underparts are well marked with dark chevrons. The combination of reddish-orange eyering, cere, and feet distinguishes them from all other falcons. These champion migrants breed in eastern Siberia and winter in southern Africa, often congregating in huge roosts on passage through India. They feed mainly on insects that they either catch on the wing or pick from the ground.

August : Orange headed thrush

Brightly-colored ground-dwelling thrush. Bright orange head, breast, and belly are unmistakable. Some subspecies have two broad black crescents on the sides of the face. Hops about foraging in the leaf litter in forested areas, often in wet gullies and ravines. Beautiful song is composed of well-spaced strophes of warbling and buzzy notes.

September : Indian Paradise Flycatcher – Female

A graceful looking flycatcher, the adult male sport a long ribbonlike tail. The males occur in two color morphs cinnamon and white. Both color morphs sport a glossy black head with blue ring around the eye, but white morph is entirely white below while the cinnamon morph has cinnamon upperparts and tail, and dirty white underparts. The females are cinnamon above with a grayish throat, a shorter tail, and they lack the male’s blue eyering. They make short aerial sallies after insects, usually returning to the same perch. Occasionally descends to ground to pull apart insects. Chiefly found in wooded habitats. Their call is a harsh “shreew.”

October : Red Necked Falcon

A rather small but powerful falcon with fast and direct flight. It has a rufous crown, nape, and moustachial stripe. A wide yellow eye-ring is quite distinct. Its upperparts are pale gray, and fine barring adorns its white underparts, which are sometimes suffused with gray. This bird of the open country mostly hunts birds on the wing, targeting its prey from a perch, often bringing it down quite close to the ground.

November : Indian Robbin

A nondescript robin; males are primarily black with chestnut bottom feathers, although males in the northern population have brownish upperparts. Males also have a white shoulder patch and a relatively long tail. Females have completely brown upperparts, lack the male’s white shoulder patch, and have grayish-brown underparts. They are generally seen in pairs, foraging on the ground with the tail cocked up. Found in open country, at forest edges, around human habitation, and in scrub lands.

December : Indian White Eye OR Oriental White Eye

Hyperactive little yellow bird with an off-white belly and white “spectacles.” Found in a wide range of habitats, from mangroves to gardens to forest edge; generally favors more open forested areas, not dense tangles. Travels in flocks, sometimes mixed in with other species. Note light bouncing flight. Gives bright but faint “zwee!” calls both while foraging and in flight.

Note : All information from : https://ebird.org/home

Published by Mukund Karadkhedkar

Engineer by profession and Wildlife Photographer by passion. Loves nature.

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